How Do Dentures Replace Lost Teeth?

When you lose a single tooth, we may recommend a dental bridge. But what happens when you lose several teeth, or even the vast majority of them? In these situations, you may benefit from a more substantial tooth loss solution, such as a full or partial denture.

Full and Partial Dentures

Dentures are designed to address advanced tooth loss and restore a patient’s ability to eat and drink, as well as enjoy a full smile. For cases of multiple missing teeth spread out across an arch, we may suggest a partial. A partial denture helps those that don’t yet need a full prosthetic. The denture contains the replacement teeth, as well as an acrylic base that looks like gum tissue. There are also metal clasps, which attach to the remaining natural teeth and anchor the new ones securely in place.

For cases in which a patient has lost all, or most, of his or her teeth, we may recommend a full prosthetic. There is an entire row of replacement teeth, as well as a lifelike acrylic base. Natural suction holds the new teeth in place, which means the prosthetic can be removed for cleaning and maintenance.

Both options can help you feel more confident in your smile.

Custom-Made Prosthetics

Before beginning either option, we will take a detailed impression of your teeth and jaw. These items will be used at a dental lab to design and create the dentures. The pontics (replacement teeth) will be created using lifelike porcelain or zirconia, which can be shaded to better blend with your smile. When worn, your new teeth will look natural and reflect your unique facial structure. If you have any questions or concerns about tooth loss, or about our custom-mad dental prosthetics, then contact our team today.

DO YOU HAVE MISSING TEETH?

At Mai Dentistry, we can offer solutions to the gaps in your smile with dentures. To learn more about our practice, or to schedule your next appointment, call our Garland, TX office today at (972) 530-0552. For our patients who don’t speak English, our office is fluent in both Spanish and Vietnamese.